Electors: Flood of Notes are Pleas not Holiday Cheers.

On December 19th, 538 electors will cast their votes for the 45th President of the United States.

However, the list of those not on board with this formality continues to grow in both the public and private domain.  On Monday, Texas Republican and presidential elector, Christopher Suprun, explained why he won’t vote for Trump in a letter to The New York Times.

“Mr. Trump lacks the foreign policy experience and demeanor needed to be commander in chief. During the campaign more than 50 Republican former national security officials and foreign policy experts co-signed a letter opposing him. In their words, ‘he would be a dangerous president.’ During the campaign Mr. Trump even said Russia should hack Hillary Clinton’s emails. This encouragement of an illegal act has troubled many members of Congress and troubles me.”  —NYT Op-Ed, 12/05/16

Despite all the rebellious cacophony, Mr. Trump is slated to be ushered in as #45.  However, with action ‘we the concerned’ will at the least continue mounting a counter-movement to the alt-right.  This has been an unprecedented election; let’s continue with our unprecedented contention.

Pressure has been mounting on electors across the country to change their pledge to a President-elect Trump.

Change.org has mounted the most successful petition started to date–with more than 4,777,000 signatures and counting–in favor of Hillary Clinton as #45.  Clinton is winning the popular vote by more than 2.6 million.

“I thought, okay, it’s Christmas card time!”  Joyce Haas, a Republican presidential elector expected to vote for Trump, told The Washington Post on Tuesday.

Haas, who represents Pennsylvania, continues receiving  a ‘steady stream’ of 100-200 notes from concerned citizens  urging that she change her vote.  Thousands of similar emails are landing in her Inbox, the 70-year-old added.

This trend–happening across the country–is expected to fall on deaf ears due to 21 unbound states, in which electors are not required to vote with the majority vote or the populace.

A group called Ask The Electors , started by an elector, provides an avenue for citizens to voices their concerns and has received more than 90,000 responses. 

As the Republican elector from Texas wrote in Monday’s op-ed:  “Fifteen years ago, I swore an oath to defend my country and Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic. On Dec. 19, I will do it again.”

Let’s join him.  Sign a petition or voice your opinion.

Below is a table of both bounded and unbounded states. (I was not able to find one among news outlets; information has been sourced via FairVote.org and the 2016 electoral map. It’s interesting to note that of the states up for recount, Michigan, Wisconsin and now Nevada are bound states, while Pennsylvania is unbound.

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