538: Trump’s Deportation Plan Same as Obama’s

FiveThirtyEight breaks down the math, and according to Homeland Security, there are 1.9 million non-citizen immigrants who have been convicted of crimes. Some of those citizens have legal status. So Trump’s claim that he is going to deport 2-3 million immigrants during the “60 Minutes” Interview is false.

Below is the headline alongside key excerpts from the November 14th article that provide insight on how a Trump presidency will impact deportation. Key items: Deportation will basically be the same as it was Obama’s first term; up to 2 million people can be deported in a 4 year period under “criminal” charges, some with minor charges; there may be rollbacks in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and plans are not clear. There are about 720,000 young people under the program.

There Aren’t 2 To 3 Million Undocumented Immigrants With Criminal Records For Trump To Deport

Key Excerpt:

“Beyond the specific numbers, the policy that Trump outlined Sunday [“60 Minutes” interview] is similar to the one President Obama pursued in his first term. When Obama first took office, he prioritized deporting undocumented immigrants with criminal convictions, in some cases even for comparatively minor violations such as traffic offenses or shoplifting, according to Randy Capps of the Migration Policy Institute. Partly as a result, deportations soared under Obama, topping 400,000 in 2012.”

538-data-graph

Key Excerpt:

“It would not be hard to get up to 2 million in four years, and most of them would be quote-unquote criminals,” Capps said, although he added that many of those criminal convictions would be for relatively minor crimes.

Key Excerpt:

Trump is also likely to roll back a central element of Obama’s immigration agenda: his Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which offers temporary legal status to people who entered the country illegally as children. During the campaign, Trump pledged to end DACA, but he hasn’t said how — whether he will close the program to new applicants, allow it to expire or end it even for the roughly three-quarters of a million people who have been granted legal status under the program.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s